Helping Trial Lawyers Navigate the Appellate System

SCOTX: Attorneys Must E-File Effective 9/12/11

[vc_row type=”in_container” full_screen_row_position=”middle” column_margin=”default” scene_position=”center” text_color=”dark” text_align=”left” overlay_strength=”0.3″ shape_divider_position=”bottom” bg_image_animation=”none”][vc_column column_padding=”no-extra-padding” column_padding_position=”all” background_color_opacity=”1″ background_hover_color_opacity=”1″ column_link_target=”_self” column_shadow=”none” column_border_radius=”none” width=”1/1″ tablet_width_inherit=”default” tablet_text_alignment=”default” phone_text_alignment=”default” overlay_strength=”0.3″ column_border_width=”none” column_border_style=”solid” bg_image_animation=”none”][vc_column_text]Texas appellate e-filing continues to evolve at a rapid pace.  Effective September 12, 2011, attorneys filing documents in the Texas Supreme Court must do so electronically.  Pro se parties may e-file, or they may submit paper documents.

Don Cruse has broken down the new order over at the Supreme Court of Texas Blog.

Aside from SCOTX, e-filing is available in the following state appellate courts:  Austin, Dallas, Eastland (new as of August 8), Houston (1st District), and Houston (14th District).  The Texarkana court may be next in line, as its website states that e-filing will be available there soon.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row]

D. Todd Smith
About the Author

D. Todd Smith is an Austin-based civil appellate specialist who works with trial teams from the earliest stages of litigation. In trial courts, he takes the lead on strategic analysis and briefing, jury charges, and potentially dispositive motions, all with a focus on preserving error and positioning cases for appellate review.

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